Beware of Fake Organics from Overseas

chalk board with vegetables

I’ve written previously about the confusion surrounding supposedly organic foods. Big food companies are capitalizing on the organic movement by using the word “organic” in their marketing.

Because these companies have proven for decades that we can’t trust them to tell us what’s in their foods in a clear, transparent way, here’s a quick primer on organic labeling requirements from the USDA National Organic Program (NOP):

  • “100% Organic”: Must contain only organically produced ingredients other than water and salt.
  • “Organic”: Must contain at least 95 percent organic ingredients.
  • “Made with Organic Ingredients”: Must contain at least 70 percent organic ingredients and list up to three organic ingredients.

Any product with less than 70 percent organic ingredients cannot use the term “organic” except to identify specific organic ingredients. Here is the official definition of organic food from the USDA NOP:

Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Continue reading

About Dr. James Proodian

Dr. James Proodian is an accomplished chiropractic physician, health educator, and professional public speaker who founded Proodian Healthcare Family of Companies to help people feel better, function better, and live longer. His expertise is in identifying clinical imbalances and restoring the body to health and functionality. Contact: jproodian@naturalhc.com or (732) 222‑2219.

Deciphering Food Labels: What Qualifies as Organic or Natural?

nutrition and labelingIn a previous post, I discussed the truth about whole grains and explained what to look for in the food label. The word “whole” must appear in the first ingredient, like whole grain, whole wheat or stone-ground whole.

If the word “whole” doesn’t appear until the second ingredient, that product could contain as little as one percent of whole grain. It’s almost like the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has created gigantic loopholes that food manufacturers drive through like a runaway truck.

Food labeling is overwhelming and confusing, which makes it difficult for us to evaluate food products and determine what we should be consuming and feeding to our children.

I wish it was as simple as it was 200 years ago. Before the industrial revolution, you really didn’t need food labels. All food was organic because that’s the way it was naturally designed. Food was grown in non-contaminated soil, harvested and eaten before it spoiled.

Continue reading

About Dr. James Proodian

Dr. James Proodian is an accomplished chiropractic physician, health educator, and professional public speaker who founded Proodian Healthcare Family of Companies to help people feel better, function better, and live longer. His expertise is in identifying clinical imbalances and restoring the body to health and functionality. Contact: jproodian@naturalhc.com or (732) 222‑2219.